First Lines Friday – 31st May 2019

First Lines Friday

Welcome to my “First Lines Fridays” this is a weekly meme, that I first saw on Jill’s Book Blog and which is originally hosted by Wondering Words.

Rules:

  1. Choose a book from your shelves/current read
  2. Open the book to the first page
  3. Copy the first line on the page, making sure you don’t give away the book title
  4. Reveal the book.

FIRST LINES:

“You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil foreboding. I arrived here yesterday, and my first task is to assure my dear sister of my welfare and increasing confidence in the success of my undertaking.

Do you recognise which book these lines come from?

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This weeks book is… Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

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Synopsis/Blurb (taken from Goodreads):

Mary Shelley began writing Frankenstein when she was only eighteen. At once a Gothic thriller, a passionate romance, and a cautionary tale about the dangers of science, Frankenstein tells the story of committed science student Victor Frankenstein. Obsessed with discovering the cause of generation and life and bestowing animation upon lifeless matter, Frankenstein assembles a human being from stolen body parts but; upon bringing it to life, he recoils in horror at the creature’s hideousness. Tormented by isolation and loneliness, the once-innocent creature turns to evil and unleashes a campaign of murderous revenge against his creator, Frankenstein.

Frankenstein, an instant bestseller and an important ancestor of both the horror and science fiction genres, not only tells a terrifying story, but also raises profound, disturbing questions about the very nature of life and the place of humankind within the cosmos: What does it mean to be human? What responsibilities do we have to each other? How far can we go in tampering with Nature? In our age, filled with news of organ donation genetic engineering, and bio

Have you read this book? How did you find it? Let me know down below.

 

 


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