First Lines Friday – 10th April 2020

First Lines Friday

Happy Good Friday!!!

Welcome to my “First Lines Fridays”.

This is a weekly meme, that I first saw on Jill’s Book Blog and which is originally hosted by Wondering Words.

Rules:

  1. Choose a book from your shelves/current read
  2. Open the book to the first page
  3. Copy the first line on the page, making sure you don’t give away the book title
  4. Reveal the book.

FIRST LINES:

LALE RATTLES ACROSS THE COUNTRYSIDE, KEEPING HIS HEAD up and himself to himself. The twenty-five-year-old see no point in getting to know the man beside him, who  occasionnaly  nods off against his shoulder; Lale doesn’t push him away.

 

Do you recognise which book these lines come from?

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This weeks book is…

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

Synopsis/Blurb (Goodreads):

“The Tattooist of Auschwitz is based on the true story of Lale and Gita Sokolov, two Slovakian Jews who survived Auschwitz and eventually made their home in Australia. In that terrible place, Lale was given the job of tattooing the prisoners marked for survival – literally scratching numbers into his fellow victims’ arms in indelible ink to create what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust. Lale used the infinitesimal freedom of movement that this position awarded him to exchange jewels and money taken from murdered Jews for food to keep others alive. If he had been caught, he would have been killed; many owed him their survival.

There have been many books about the Holocaust – and there will be many more. What makes this one so memorable is Lale Sokolov’s incredible zest for life. He understood exactly what was in store for him and his fellow prisoners, and he was determined to survive – not just to survive but to leave the camp with his dignity and integrity intact, to live his life to the full. Terrible though this story is, it is also a story of hope and of courage. It is also – almost unbelievably – a love story. Waiting in line to be tattooed, terrified and shaking, was a young girl. For Lale – a dandy, a jack-the-lad, a bit of a chancer – it was love at first sight, and he determined not only to survive himself but to ensure that Gita did, too. His story – their story – will make you weep, but you will also find it uplifting. It shows the very best of humanity in the very worst of circumstances.

Like many survivors, Lale and Gita told few people their story after the war. They eventually made their way to Australia, where they raised a son and had a successful life. But when Gita died, Lale felt he could no longer carry the burden of their past alone. He chose to tell his story. Publisher’s Summary”

You can read my thoughts on this book here.

Have you read this book? How did you find it? Let me know down below.


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